Lead Paint Poisoning

Jul 28, 2015 by

We now know that lead is a potent and poisonous metal that can cause serious medical problems. However, before this was discovered, lead was commonly used in products from paint to children’s toys. Even after the ban, products with lead remain, posing devastating health risks to those exposed to the metal. Lead is particularly dangerous if digested, making children even more susceptible to the dangers of lead, according to the website of Crowe Mulvey.

With the immense dangers lead poisoning poses, it is important to know the products that may contain this metal. One of the most common products known to contain lead before 1978 was paint. This means that homes built before this year may still contain this paint. Lead paint may also have been used to paint children’s toys and other products. This is dangerous as children have a tendency to chew on objects. Lead was not only used in paint, however. The metal was used in pipes and plumbing before it was shown to be dangerous. This poses the same risk of lead being in older homes, but also opens the possibility of lead contaminating drinking water if it was used in sink faucets. There is a number of other products that can potentially contain lead and cause poisoning. Lead poisoning can cause health risks in adults and developmental problems in children.

Poisoning of any kind is a terrifying thought. It can become even more scary when things you come into contact with on many occasions can cause it. Even though the use of lead to make a number of products has been stopped, it is still possible to come into contact with the metal. If you start to experience signs of lead poisoning or suspect your children may have been exposed to it, it is vital to visit a doctor as soon as possible.

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Factors of Negligence

Apr 14, 2015 by

For an action to be considered “negligent,” it has to pass four determining factors. There are four aspects to a negligence claim that overall determine if compensation should be dealt. These four elements regard the defendant’s duty, breach of that duty, causation and damages.

The first step asks whether or not the defendant had a legal duty of care. For example, drivers have a legal duty of care for other drivers around them. Their duty is to drive safely, with regard for the personal safety of others on the road.

Following the first step of legal duty is the element of breach of duty. This factor entails that someone with a legal duty violates that duty, and acted unlike a “reasonably prudent person” would. The phrase “reasonably prudent person” simply means an average person. When the defendant’s action is found to be contrary to what an average, reasonable person would do, breach of duty is evident.

Once past the first two steps, the third element to consider is causation. If the defendant’s duty has been identified and a breach of this duty has occurred, then there must be reason to prove that the action is the cause of the plaintiffs injury. Furthermore, there must be evidence that the defendant could foresee and prevent the accident from occurring.

Lastly, the damages are assessed. This is the final step, and determines the compensation amount, if any, that will be given to the plaintiff.

According to the website of the attorneys at the Abel Law Firm, medical bills and property damage expenses can add up, and compensation can significantly help the situation of someone injured.

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